5 Signs that my breastfeed baby is getting enough milk

5 signs that you baby is gettin enough milkThis is so very often a question that concerns new mums who are thinking of breastfeeding. After all there isn’t a measure on our boobs like there is on the bottle is there? We don’t know how many ounces they’re having like we do when we make up formula. My response to this question is SO WHAT?

I know it’s worrying, I get it you don’t want your baby to starve and you need to know for your own sanity that your baby is definitely getting the right amount of milk he needs. So I’m going to share 4 signs that your baby is feeding well.

5 Easy Peasy Signs that your baby is getting enough milk.

1. Weight Gain.
If your baby is gaining weight he is getting enough milk. Simple. In the early weeks your baby will be weighed at regular intervals and weight gain is a reassuring sign.

2. Let’s talk POO here!
Your baby should have one dirty nappy for each day of his life up to day four and then at least 2 but maybe  3 to 4 poos a day after that sometimes more. You will get to know your own baby’s normal bowel movements.

You can also tell a lot by the colour and appearance of your baby’s poo. Take a look here CLICK HERE

3. Wet nappies
5 or 6 wet nappies per day. However, because nappies are extremely good at soaking up the urine you might not always be able to tell. TIP: Insert a piece of cotton wool or tissue into a clean nappy and check at change time.

4. Contented baby.
He will usually come off the breast on his own, sleepy, happy and relaxed after a feed? Fusing and crying is not a content baby.

5. Empty Boobs
Well, not really, but your breasts will feel different after a good feed. The will feel softer and not as firm. Most mums think the feel empty. They aren’t empty but might feel that way.

So, you see there’s no need to worry as long as you are feeding your baby when he indicates he wants feeding and not putting him on a schedule you are on the right track. Do remember in the early days/weeks baby’s should be fed at least every 2 hours some times more often. There tummies are really small and don’t hold alot of milk at once. They need to fill their tummies often.

You might feel like you are always feeding, that your baby is feeding far too much. Nope, you can’t overfeed a breastfed baby.

Shellie x

The Truth about Potty Training in 10 minutes.


Potty Training 10 minsI remember first thinking about potty training when my son was approximately two years old. I had this figure in my head, that most children were ready for potty training at two and just went a head. I don’t think I really knew the ‘readiness’ signs and if I did, it was probably only one or two that  I had decided where ‘readiness’ signs myself..

But what you need to bear in mind with this stage of development is that the skills your little one needs are many and complex. It’s worth thinking about the time you learnt to drive a car. Can you remember how many different things you had to juggle. Clutch, brake, steering, mirror, handbrake, watching the road, decision making. YEH? Loads of things, it was really difficult and took lots of effort and concentration didn’t it? I used to be exhausted when I had finished a lesson.

Well, it’s the same for your toddler learning to potty train. There are so many skills they need to co-ordinate to achieve this stage of development. So lets have a look at what skills they need. It’s no ‘mean feat’ really!

Cognitive Skills – What are they anyway?

Cognitive skillCognitive functioning is a term referring to a human’s ability to process (thoughts). Cognition mainly refers to things like memory, the ability to learn new information, speech, understanding of written material.

So what does this mean and how does it relate to learning to go on the potty?

  • Well, firstly your toddler needs to recognise the feeling and remember it when they want to go to the toilet.
  • Then they need to remember not to do the ‘deed’ in their nappy/pants
  • Then they have to remember to find the potty (without getting distracted)
  • Sit down and concentrate long enough to perform the deed.
  • Next, they need to understand and process the words you’re using to explain to them what they need to do.
  • They also need to be able to verbal express their desires to go to the toilet. AND that’s just the cognitive skills they need to co-ordinate potty training never mind anymore!

Physical skills

  • Ability to take clothes on and off and particularly pull pants up and down
  • Ability to walk.

Emotional skills

  • Independence.
  • No fear of using the potty and a desire to copy others.

That’s quite an array of skills there for your little one. It’s no wonder ‘potty training’ can take some time and why it’s commonly said that Potty Training is a development stage that can’t be rushed and should be done when your child is ready.

It’s a complicated skill isn’t it? Glad I’m not learning again ha, ha.

Shellie x

3 Ways to STOP hating your partner now you’re a parent.


3 Ways to Stop 'HATING' your husband now you are parentsAnd then there was three and your little fantasy of how wonderful life was going to be is quickly fading. You find your partner intensely irritating to the point of wanting to ‘slit his throat’ OK perhaps that’s a bit strong but you’re slowly seeing that he’s NOT living up to your expectations in the ‘daddy’ department. Your ‘sick to death’ of him thinking you sit at home all day with your feet up and really resent being the one to take on the majority of the chores, seaminly because you’re at home. Well kiddo you’re not on your own. Relationships take a beating and certainly change in the transition to parenthood. Now there’s a surprise! Well, not really considering every single part of your life is not left untouched by this little addition to the family. I bet your now starting to see what a massive deal this parenthood thing is aren’t you?

So what can we do to make sure we’re not heading for the divorce courts in the future!

Well, it’s not easy, and I never, ever said it would be. But you owe it to yourself and your partner and your child to work on your relationship

1. Your first PRIORITY being your relationship
Making your relationship a priority is not selfish.
You are adults with needs too. It really isn’t just about the baby. We all get so fixated about being perfect parents that we forget to care for ourselves and our relationship. Relationships take time and effort. You have permission to spend some time together away from your child.

See my board on p-interest “DATE NIGHT” its not all about going out.

Maybe you could set up a ‘babysitting circle.’ Do you have friends with young children? That way you could look after each others children so you all get some couple time? You’ll all benefiting from time out and will know and trust the babysitter too. Win, win situation.

2. Better ways to argue
Everyone argues and given the amount of changes that are taking place in the transition to parenthood it’s no wonder that couples feel they row more.

However, according to John Gottman – Executive Director of the Relationship Research Institute it’s not about how many times a day we row with each other. It’s more about how we row. Destructive ways of arguing include: Being defensive, criticising, contempt and not wanting to discuss issues with each other.

John recommends planning an amicable discussion and thinking carefully about what you want to say beforehand in order that you don’t start a conversation with anger and aggression. I know easier said than done, but it’s worth bearing in mind. We all know that it’s easier to say things we don’t mean in the heat of the moment.

Beware of your feelings and emotions. Take time to reflect and ask yourself why you are reacting the way you are. What is really bothering you? Is there something more? Be honest with yourself and your partner.

Compromise. Listen to what you both want, and then try to work out a solution that you are both relatively happy with. One of you should never feel compromised.

Easier said than done when we are in the heat of a row, but it does make perfect sense. Maybe it’s worth thinking about these points in the future.

3. Sharing the load.
Have you fallen into a bit of a rut with the household chores? Are you starting to feel resentful? It’s quite often the case when we become mothers that we take on the ‘lions share’ of the domestic chores. This usually tends to happen when maternity leave starts. We spend all day at home with plenty of time on our hands. But once that bambino comes along we have little time to go for a WEE nevermind make a meal! Have you explained the reality to your partner lately? Maybe it just needs saying.

Otherwise it can become a real ‘bone of contention.’ Dad’s think we’re at home all day doing nothing. It’s sometimes really difficult for them to accept how tiring it can be looking after a baby 24/7. But equally your partner also has the responsibility of going to work and providing financially for you and baby, that too can be a drain and worry for your partner. Try to see both sides of the coin.

Are things about to change? Maybe your planning on going back to work. Will you still be responsible for all the chores?

Have an honest conversation about sharing the workload. What do you expect of each other.? Can the chores be split fairly. Does one of you enjoy cooking more than shopping. Can the shopping be done online so neither of you really have to bother with it. Can you both take it in-turns to ‘batch cook and freeze meals so it’s not ultimately any ones responsibility to provide a meal through the week when your both tired. Can you take it in turns to catch up on sleep at the weekend?

Most importantly, go easy on yourselves. You are both adjusting to a massive transition. One of the biggest transitions of adult life. Try to be mindful of this and work together to get through the challenges. Share your thoughts with each other. Spend time MAKING time for each other even if it just means a snuggle on the sofa watching TV or making sure you hit the sack TOGETHER even if it is just for SLEEP 😉

P.S. Remember you are not on your own. 83% of couples have moderate to severe relationship problems in the early years, this period of transition can be that challenging to navigate. Just because parents don’t talk about it doesn’t mean it’s not happening.

This really is just the tip of the iceberg in terms of how relationships change and I look forward to sharing more with you in the coming months.

Shellie xx

3 Ways to CRACK the Relationship Code now you’re a parent

3 Ways to Stop 'HATING' your husband now you are parentsAnd then there was three and your little fantasy of how wonderful life was going to be is quickly fading. You find your partner intensely irritating to the point of wanting to ‘slit his throat’ OK perhaps that’s a bit strong but you’re slowly seeing that he’s NOT living up to your expectations in the ‘daddy’ department. Your ‘sick to death’ of him thinking you sit at home all day with your feet up and really resent being the one to take on the majority of the chores, seaminly because you’re at home. Well kiddo you’re not on your own. Relationships take a beating and certainly change in the transition to parenthood. Now there’s a surprise! Well, not really considering every single part of your life is not left untouched by this little addition to the family. I bet your now starting to see what a massive deal this parenthood thing is aren’t you?

So what can we do to make sure we’re not heading for the divorce courts in the future!

Well, it’s not easy, and I never, ever said it would be. But you owe it to yourself and your partner and your child to work on your relationship

1. Your first PRIORITY being your relationship
Making your relationship a priority is not selfish.
You are adults with needs too. It really isn’t just about the baby. We all get so fixated about being perfect parents that we forget to care for ourselves and our relationship. Relationships take time and effort. You have permission to spend some time together away from your child.

See my board on p-interest “DATE NIGHT” its not all about going out.

Maybe you could set up a ‘babysitting circle.’ Do you have friends with young children? That way you could look after each others children so you all get some couple time? You’ll all benefiting from time out and will know and trust the babysitter too. Win, win situation.

2. Better ways to argue

Everyone argues and given the amount of changes that are taking place in the transition to parenthood it’s no wonder that couples feel they row more.

However, according to John Gottman – Executive Director of the Relationship Research Institute it’s not about how many times a day we row with each other. It’s more about how we row. Destructive ways of arguing include: Being defensive, criticising, contempt and not wanting to discuss issues with each other.

John recommends planning an amicable discussion and thinking carefully about what you want to say beforehand in order that you don’t start a conversation with anger and aggression. I know easier said than done, but it’s worth bearing in mind. We all know that it’s easier to say things we don’t mean in the heat of the moment.

Beware of your feelings and emotions. Take time to reflect and ask yourself why you are reacting the way you are. What is really bothering you? Is there something more? Be honest with yourself and your partner.

Compromise. Listen to what you both want, and then try to work out a solution that you are both relatively happy with. One of you should never feel compromised.

Easier said than done when we are in the heat of a row, but it does make perfect sense. Maybe it’s worth thinking about these points in the future.

3. Sharing the load.

Have you fallen into a bit of a rut with the household chores? Are you starting to feel resentful? It’s quite often the case when we become mothers that we take on the ‘lions share’ of the domestic chores. This usually tends to happen when maternity leave starts. We spend all day at home with plenty of time on our hands. But once that bambino comes along we have little time to go for a WEE nevermind make a meal! Have you explained the reality to your partner lately? Maybe it just needs saying.

Otherwise it can become a real ‘bone of contention.’ Dad’s think we’re at home all day doing nothing. It’s sometimes really difficult for them to accept how tiring it can be looking after a baby 24/7. But equally your partner also has the responsibility of going to work and providing financially for you and baby, that too can be a drain and worry for your partner. Try to see both sides of the coin.

Are things about to change? Maybe your planning on going back to work. Will you still be responsible for all the chores?

Have an honest conversation about sharing the workload. What do you expect of each other.? Can the chores be split fairly. Does one of you enjoy cooking more than shopping. Can the shopping be done online so neither of you really have to bother with it. Can you both take it in-turns to ‘batch cook and freeze meals so it’s not ultimately any ones responsibility to provide a meal through the week when your both tired. Can you take it in turns to catch up on sleep at the weekend?

Most importantly, go easy on yourselves. You are both adjusting to a massive transition. One of the biggest transitions of adult life. Try to be mindful of this and work together to get through the challenges. Share your thoughts with each other. Spend time MAKING time for each other even if it just means a snuggle on the sofa watching TV or making sure you hit the sack TOGETHER even if it is just for SLEEP 😉

P.S. Remember you are not on your own. 83% of couples have moderate to severe relationship problems in the early years, this period of transition can be that challenging to navigate. Just because parents don’t talk about it doesn’t mean it’s not happening.

This really is just the tip of the iceberg in terms of how relationships change and I look forward to sharing more with you in the coming months.

Shellie xx

6 Ways to Handle Toddler Tantrums

Toddler Tantrum

Toddler Tantrums

You’re toddlers tantrums are their way of saying: “Hey, I’m having feelings and an emotional responses that I don’t understand and I can’t control”. Feelings such as: Frustration, loss disappointment and not being understood are the crux of it.

Boy or boy did I dislike this stage. For some unfortunate reason my first two boys had the most horrific tantrums. I often felt like I’d tried everything in my power to deal with them. They would quite often push me to breaking point. Hence me being a big advocate of looking after yourself and your emotional health these days. Dealing with toddler tantrums and emotions can be draining and you must find time to restore your own emotional balance in-order to deal with these little or (BIG) outbursts effectively.

Tantrums most often happen because of a child’s immature language skills and lack of emotional control. Triggers can include hunger, tiredness, illness, boredom and being over stimulated.

Tantrums are equally difficult for parents and toddlers to handle. I sympathise with you the parent. I totally ‘get’ and remember the shame and humiliation of those ‘public place’ tantrums. OMG! The whole ‘Wish the ground would swallow me up whole’ feeling. The shame, the humiliation of not being able to silence your child. What must people think? How on earth do I handle this one like a good parent? The feelings of judgement and the whispers from older people who quite frankly have forgotten what it’s like to deal with younger children. The glares from the “I will never let my children behave like that” (without children brigade)

But, keep telling yourself tantrums are a healthy part of child development. Tantrums serve a purpose and are extremely important. Most children at some stage or another have tantrums. Granted some are more prone than others to huge emotional outbursts and it’s usually to do with the child’s unique temperament. And for the record you can’t change a child’s temperament, so you just have to find ways to deal with how they respond effectively. So don’t feel guilty or that you are a bad mummy in anyway if your child tantrums more than your friends child does. Just be mindful that your child is reacting normally and is developing and carving our crucial pathways in the brain for handling stress in later months and years.

So what can you do?

1. Meet your own emotional needs first.
Why? Because if you aren’t meeting your own needs and ’emotionally regulating’ yourself you can’t deal with your toddlers strong emotions effectively. If you are emotionally ‘on the ceiling’ your best response will more than likely be to ‘fly off into a rage’ meaning you will not respond to your child’s emotional outbursts with clear rational thinking. AND remember emotional responses often fuel tantrums making them worse.

2. Choose your battles.
At around about 12-24 months children want to exercise independence. Does it really matter if their clothes don’t match or if they want to eat with their fingers and not a spoon?

3. Talk about and teach your toddler to recognise emotions
Talk to your toddler about feelings. Point out when your toddler is feeling emotions and try to explain why he might be feeling
like he is. Find creative ways to deal with the feelings. For example if they are angry, would tit help them to squeeze a stress ball. Or maybe they could have an ‘angry teddy’ that they are allowed to yell at, hit some cushions, kick a ball, jump about, draw an angry picture of themselves.

It’s also helpful to draw faces, happy, sad, angry frustrated. Or collect pictures of faces from books and magazines. Talk about the faces with your child. Talk with your child about what these face might be feeling and ask him or her why they might feel this way.

Another idea is to use your own face to mirror feelings and ask your child if he knows how you feel by looking at your face.

4.Make and personalise your own Calming Down Jar
I love the idea of these calming down jars, have you seen them on my pinterest board? >>HERE
<<

5. Create opportunities for them to choose and make some of their own decisions.
For example. If they don’t want a bath, you could give them a choice like this. “When you’ve had your bath you can choose whether you wear the spotty pj’s or the stripped ones.”

6. Routines.
I use the word ‘routine’ loosely here. For me it’s more about some structure. For babies and toddlers alike routines provide a sense of security. Children like predictability it makes them feel safe if they can anticipate what is coming next. Nothing is a shock or surprise. For example, if your toddler often has a tantrum because he wants to continue playing at tea-time, having a routine can help. Some parents find it useful to give verbal time checks to their children prior to the transition e.g. 5 minutes and you will have to stop playing and eat your tea. Some even use a visual cue such as an timer.

It’s important to remember thought that tantrums are completely and utterly normal and an important part of child development. In-fact, they are so important because your toddler is creating pathways in their brain that will enable him to manage stress more easily.

Don’t forget to check out my >>pinterest board<< there is a fabulous collection of creative ideas for dealing with tantrums on there.

Hope that helps
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

TANTRUM S.O.S Call
Is your little one is having tantrum after tantrum after temper tantrum
and you don’t know what to do?
You’ve tried everything you can think of, nothing has worked.

You’re stuck. Let’s you and I have a chat and get to the bottom of it now.
>>Click here to book your FREE 30 Min Call.<<
I’ll be in touch. 
Shellie x

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

Emotional Health – 5 Ways to be a Happy Mummy

 

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You’ve probably seen this image doing the rounds on social media. I know I have. But what exactly does
“ You can’t pour from an empty cup mean?

Well, let me explain.  In the 1940’s a psychologist  called Abraham Maslow worked it all out when he created the ‘Hierarchy of Needs .’Basically in a ‘nutshell’ our human ‘needs’ have to be met for us to remain physically and emotionally healthy and happy . CLICK HERE for more info.

BUT, how about when we become mums, is it so easy to look after our emotional health? There’s no disputing this ‘Mummyhood’ thing can be a challenge. You’re taking care of your child’s physical and emotional needs 24/7. How on earth do you manage to take care of our own well-being?

We need to learn to put our self near the top of the list. We need some emotional regulation too. If not, we become stressed, angry, depressed and depleted. We can’t response empathetically to our children, our brain becomes flooded with stress chemicals and we can’t think straight. We can’t enjoy mummyhood and we can’t meet anyone elses need sufficently if we don’t take care of our self.

It is essential that we ‘RE-FUEL our own Emotional Tank’ and look after our own needs so we can effectively take care of our children’s needs.

So here are a few things that are important to think about when you are a mummy. Just working on these few things will go a long way to making you a happier, calmer mummy who can cope with the demands of the job.

1. Learn to recognise when you need to refuel your own emotional tank.

There is no instruction book given out when we become parents.  It’s on the JOB training. The demands of juggling many other areas of your life and a baby can sometimes be overwhelming. Go easy on yourself. Learn to recognise your signs of stress and overwhelm. If you never refuel your emotional tank you are at risk feeling overwhelmed with the demands of parenthood. So what are the signs that you need to refuel? Suffering from any of these?

* Stressed, * anxious, * overwhelmed * Irritated and bad tempered * Not wanting to play, cuddle or interact with baby *Resentful. *Seeing the baby as demanding. * Frazzled *Not feeling like you can cope. These are all signs that you are emotionally depleted you need to take some time for YOU.

2 . Manage your Stress

What activities calm and relax you? What restores and rebalances your mood?

  • Take five minutes to focus on some relaxation techniques, massage, meditation, deep breathing or visualisation. www.calm.com
  • Read a book or take a warm bath, light some candles and have 30 minutes of peace and relaxation.
  • Enjoy a WARM cuppa when your little one has an afternoon nap. Watch Catch Up TV.
  • Establish support networks. Meet up with like minded people and normalises the trials and tribulations of parenthood. Talk to people who understand the stage you are going through. It’s good to offload. Talking to someone who totally ‘gets’ your stresses and strains is often FANTASTIC therapy. Find and make friends with mums who are at the same stage as you.
  • Try some Aromatherapy fragrances around the house. Look into which are good for stress and will lift your mood. Amazon is a good place to start.

4. Expectations Versus Reality and Relationships

Except that life is different now, Be kind to yourself and your partner. Parenting can put a strain on the most solid of relationships. Try to keep the lines of communication open with each other. Make time for regular ‘Date Nights’ or Date Afternoons CLICK HERE for ideas. Time for each other for adult time. Even if it’s just a night in with a planned takeaway, no cooking and a film.

3. Plan your ME TIME
Why not draw up a plan that incorporates a specific amount of me time for yourself EVERY single day! Even if it is just that warm cuppa a nap time. It will help keep you going when you have bad days.

Plan your date nights in advance too. Don’t forget to look here. CLICK HERE. Stick your plan where you can see it for extra motivation! Tick your me time off every day.

5. Eat Healthy
Hard as it is, try to ensure you have a good balanced diet. Don’t miss breakfast. Food enhances our mood. The chemical Serotonin is responsible for improving our mood and emotions and also our sleep quality. Low Serotonin levels can leave us feeling depressed, aggressive andn anxious. Tryptophan found in foods such as banana, bread, pasta and oily fish is the building block for Serotonin. For the brain to produced Serotonin we need a diet that contains vitamins B and folic acid eating things like baked potatoes, chicken and beef will help.

Learn to batch cook and freeze, that way takes the pressure off when your not feeling up to cooking and you still have something healthy and nutritious to eat. Why not invest in a slow cooker too.

Take any vitamins that may help your health and remember your doing the hardest job in the world. It’s NOT selfish to take care of your own needs, it’s essential!

Shellie x

 

Tens Machine for pain relief (Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation.

Pain Relief in labour – T.E.N.S. Machines

TENS Machines have been used as a method of relieving pain in labour since the the 1970’s would you believe, so they aren’t a new fad and are still popular today as a pain relief option for labour. (Bilncoe A 2007).

TENS machines are used for approximately 21% of births in the UK. Some Maternity Units have them readily available to use, but they can be bought or hired easily enough.

So what does the TENS Machine look like and how do I use it and how does it work?

A Tens machine is a small electrical device that can be held in the hand and controlled by you at the ‘press’ of a button.
The machine then delivers controlled, low voltage, electrical pulses through electrode pads which are placed on the base of the back. Some advise placing the pads on acupuncture points maybe beneficial, but there is no proof to suggest TENS would work better in this way.

Are TENS Machines safe? 

The TENS machine is considered safe as it is a non invasive method of pain relief which means it doesn’t seem to cause any harm to mum or baby. It does not increase the length of labour, or chances of intervention (forceps, episiotomy, C-Section) as other methods of pain relief do. 

If you are considering using a TENS Machine it is more beneficial and helpful to use one in early labour.

Advantages of using Tens machines:
• Non invasive • Drug free • No side effects • Simple to use
• Women can remain mobile and make use of labour positions
• Can be used for a home birth • Mum controls it • Its portable
• Endorsed by Midwives • Non Drowsy •Safe for mum and baby
• Used in Home/Hospital Birth • Compatible with other methods.
• Can be used prior to a Water Birth.
Disadvantages of using Tens Machines:
• Midwife’s not trained to use them.
• Have to be taken off if baby has to be monitored
• Do not use before 37 weeks pregnant
• Do not use if you have epilepsy/pacemaker
• Most effective after one hours use.
• May only be useful in the early stages of labour.
• Back massage can be awkward

 

But does it work?
It’s not know exactly how Tens machines work. One possibility is it prevents pain messages from the uterus, vagina and perineum reaching the brain. Another viable reason might be that it stimulates nerves to send messages to the brain, so our body produced it’s own natural pain killers called endorphins. These endorphins help to dull the pain.

Many trials have been carried out on the TENS Machine and they all come to the same conclusion.  There is little evidence to suggest that the TENS Machine works to reduce the pain.

So, could it be that the TENS Machine is merely a distraction, perhaps the same as  other forms of coping in labour for example massage, breathing and moving about? That’s not to say that distraction methods aren’t helpful because they are. Distraction helps you to keep calm which also help the body to release  natural pain killers (endorphins) and the hormone vital for labour oxytocin.

When thinking of using a TENS Machine in labour it might be worth thinking and asking yourself these questions.

Do you want total pain relief or do you just want to cope?
How well do you tolerate pain?
Think about using it with other pain relief methods to increase it’s effectiveness.

So do they work and should I consider one?

As far as  research suggests, I can see there is no reason why mums-to-be shouldn’t give tens machine a go. There are no guarantees that they will feel benefit from using one, but it might be that it provides enough distraction when used with other methods of coping to help. It should also be said that it is probably  more effective as a coping method of pain relief in early labour.

Shellie x

 

 

Birth and labour – 5 things every Mum-To-Be MUST know.

birth and labourLet’s get down to the ‘nitty gritty’ of birth and labour shall we?How do you manage what could be 12 hours plus of pain?
There’s going to be no ‘sugar coating’ here I’m afraid. I’m not going to tell you that  labour an birth  wont be painful because it more than likely will be at some stage, BUT there are so many things you can do to manage and ease the pain and discomfort.
Don’t miss our free class.  >>>CLICK HERE <<<

1. Distraction

Try focusing on these things below instead:

  • Breathing exercises
  • TV
  • Download your favourite tunes onto your phone or ipod
  • Massage
  • Visualisation – think about meeting your baby or try taking yourself back to your favourite holiday
  • Keep top of mind that with each contraction you’re near to delivering your baby.
  • Remember your clever body also has natural pain relievers in the way of a hormone called endorphins.

2.  Relax 

Another vital and essential skill to practise whilst pregnant is to learn how and what relaxes you ready for labour.

Again some of these have been mentioned above. To some of use relaxation comes easily, but to others it feels strange, silly, we can’t switch our minds off. It’s worth remembering that the more you practise relaxation techniques the better you will be equipt to use these skills in labour which in turn will help you to cope mentally and physically.

Why not give it a go now. Downloads some relaxations and get practising.

3. Never, EVER lay on the bed. EVER!

So, if you’ve never done any antenatal classes you will probably assume (because of what you’ve seen on TV) that birthing your baby happens on your back on a bed. NOOOOO! This is a complete no, no. It’s uncomfortable, it can prolong labour and can increase your risk of intervention. Never lay on that bed if you can help it. (within reason of course).

There is a little ‘mantra’ is use to help my clients remember the importance of being upright and mobile. “U.F.O.” Upright, forward and open. This relates to the position of the pelvis.
‘U’ – Upright position so walking, standing sitting down, squatting, in fact any position when your hips are higher than your knees.

F- Leaning forward. This can help to increase the size of the pelvis by up to 30%. This happens as it moves the part of the pelvis called the ‘sacrum’ back and out of the way so the baby has more room to pass through the opening of the pelvis.’

O- Opens, speaks for itself really. Make sure your legs are open and you are leaning forward to create maximum space in the pelvis for the baby to pass.

It’s a good idea to get familiar with and practice different birthing positions before labour begins this way you can see which you find most comfortable before the birth.

4. Educate yourself

Whether you pay for Antenatal Classes, prefer One-to-One Antenatal Sessions, attend free NHS class or simply read books and use google. Make sure you try to find out as much as you can to prepare for birth and labour.

Antenatal Education may seem like a luxury or an expense you can do without. You may even feel you can find out all the information you need on google. But really, can you? How do you know what you need to know? How do you know what is valuable and correct information? but you will gain and it’s something I really would highly recommend.  You truly will learn so many things that you simply would not have thought of had you just relied on ‘good old’ google.

5. Stay at home as long as possible.

We’re talking hormones again here and how they work. Let me explain briefly. A hormone called ‘Oxytocin’ works better when we are relaxed and in our familiar surroundings. This hormone plays a vital part in promoting and establishing labour. The production of this essential hormone ‘Oxytocin’ can so easily be disturbed by fear, anxiety and lack of privacy to name but a few. This disruption of this hormone can mean labour grinds to a halt. Often a mother who has been labouring well at home arrives at the hospitial to find her contractions stop, usually but not exclusively because of the things I have just mentioned. Hence the reasons for staying at home for as long as you can or until you are in established labour.

It’s so important to think about how you will manage the first stages of labour so you are able to cope with labour and stay at home for as long as you can.

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